snowy woodburn

West Virginia University’s policy for inclement weather states, “Should conditions occur making travel potentially dangerous, both students and employees are reminded to use their own good judgment before venturing out.”

Snow days a day many elementary, middle and high school students look forward to every winter. Just a day when you wake up for school and you get to crawl back into your warm bed or go outside and play in the snow with your friends.

In college, snow days are almost unheard of, and canceled classes seem to be few and far between. But sometimes it is unsafe to travel in severe weather, especially for college students who walk far distances, take public transportation or drive to class.

West Virginia University’s policy for inclement weather states, “Should conditions occur making travel potentially dangerous, both students and employees are reminded to use their own good judgment before venturing out.”

The decision to cancel the University as a whole for severe weather is under the discretion of several University officials. A cancellation of the school altogether is determined by the conditions of campus roads and grounds as well as the surrounding area.

Most other universities follow a policy along the same lines as WVU, all with the common theme that the schools want to stay open as long as possible and as long as it’s safe for students.

Since WVU has three campuses that span over miles and students are expected to travel to and from these campuses, it would make sense for classes to be canceled more often due to inclement weather, especially since waiting in line for a PRT or bus in extreme weather conditions can be harmful.

High winds, snow and below freezing temperatures can have very dangerous effects. According to Business Insider, frostbite can occur in as little as 30 minutes if the temperature is 0° F and if the wind speed is 15 mph, creating a wind chill temperature of -19° F. Traveling to classes can take longer than that especially with delays from unreliable public transportation.

With the rise of online courses and submission sites such as WVU’s eCampus, the idea of staying home as opposed to braving the cold looks that much better. According to a student mobile survey conducted by Pearson, nine in 10 college students use some sort of laptop to do school work every week. Put the amount of students who own laptops and the amount of online-centered work together and a snow day at home makes perfect sense.

Even with the arguments for canceled classes in extreme weather conditions, we all have to face it at some point. College is a preparation for your job in the real world, and at most jobs, snow days aren’t a thing. Adaptation

is key.

You must adapt and find a way to solve your problem. But then again, snow days are a lot of fun, so praying for one is always an option, too.