U92 FM at WVU

U92 FM at WVU

College radio at West Virginia University isn’t just a chance to home skills that will help you throughout your entire life; you might just meet your best friends in the process. This isn’t your father’s radio station. WVU’s college radio station, celebrating its 37th year, has something for everybody: whether you are a broadcasting student, a journalism major, looking to hone the type of skills that you can use for the rest of your life, or simply looking for a place to call your own.

Why you should listen to college radio

Who We Are

First hitting the airwaves in 1982, U92 is “perhaps the most diverse extracurricular activity on campus,” according to former U92 Sports Director Mike Wagenheim, a 2001 graduate, former Division I play-by-play commentator, and news correspondent stationed in Israel. U92 exists in the most peculiar of Venn Diagrams: It brings together underground, alternative and traditional college radio musicians and enthusiasts as well as future broadcasters and journalists who hone their craft under the tutelage of professional staff and the ready assistance of thousands of successful alumni.

“U92 is the reason I stayed at WVU,” said Adam Crowley, a former U92 Sports Rookie of the Year. “I met my best friends at the station. I didn’t know a group of people that was so diverse could get along until I worked there.” Crowley, now a full-time radio host for ESPN Radio Pittsburgh, is 2013 WVU alumnus.

What We Do

U92 is a 24/7 radio station that is, at bare minimum, always spinning the newest tunes (okay, not many records as in the past), updating campus on the sports and news of the day, and bringing live sporting events, talk shows and remote broadcasts to the campus community. The content is entirely student-generated. The music staff identifies underexposed music you won’t hear on traditional commercial radio stations. Some of these bands remain small, but some of them become household names: The Killers, The Avett Brothers, The War on Drugs, Radiohead, The Strokes, and Courtney Barnett are all vintage college radio bands from different eras. You don’t need to be an expert on any one genre or any one band to be a U92 DJ. In fact, what you really need, is an open mind.

The sports department covers women’s soccer, women’s basketball, baseball and club hockey. They broadcast every home game, deliver on-the-hour updates and host talk shows and podcasts each week.

Our news department provides hourly updates and hosts in-depth and hard-hitting programs.

These students supplement the skills they learn in class with experience in the field reporting, interviewing and writing.

Where We’re Going

U92 spent 37 years in the Mountainlair. If you ask an alum, they’ll tell you their fond stories of working in U92’s cramped but cozy confines.

While respecting U92’s culture and tradition, the radio station is raising the funds needed to move into a new state-of-the-art space. After this move, student media will better serve the WVU community as a multimedia organization while helping train young broadcasters journalists, and sales and marketing staffers for an evolving industry.

“This station helped shape me into the woman I am today,” former DJ and 2011 alum Zabrina Evans said. “Let’s help the next generation.” Join us in being a part of that next generation.

“And you might just make some lifelong friendships in the process,” Crowley said.